How it all began

Hello everybody and welcome to my blog on my brand new website! My name is Christopher Griksaitis and I’m a 27 year old opera singer from the North East of England. This blog is a way for me to discuss my music. I’d like to talk about my experiences, my new projects as well as the world of opera and auditions.

I can’t begin my blog or my story without a huge thank you to my piano teachers Jackie Brough and Christopher Thompson, who sadly passed away last year, my violin and viola teacher Louise MucKien and, of course, my singing teachers until now, John Forsyth and Gwion Thomas. I have been so lucky to have such wonderful and supportive teachers, who always encouraged me to find my own way to express myself and who really made me so passionate about all forms of music.

Christopher playing aged 11
Me playing piano aged 11

I started piano when I was 5 and I still play it every single day. I’ve always loved to sing as I play but how I started singing professionally was a little bit by chance really. When I was 13, I began playing viola with the Tees Valley Youth Orchestra. We used to go on tour with the Tees Valley Youth Choir but we were always split into 2 separate busses. Fate, however, seemed to have a different plan and on our tour to Spain when I was 16, there was an administrative error and I was accidentally assigned to the choir bus.

I honestly cannot thank that “error” enough. As choirs usually do, they sang every now and again during the journey and I would sing along with them. John Forsyth, the choirmaster who would later become my first singing teacher, came to me to convince me to join the choir. I’d always loved singing and so when we returned from Spain, I joined the Tees Valley Youth Choir.

My first concert as a singer had me learning and performing the incredible Mozart’s Requiem in less than 2 weeks. It felt a bit like being thrown into the deep end but I loved every single second of it and from that moment on, I knew nothing could ever give me the excitement, emotion and exhilaration that singing can. From the first note of the concert right through to the last, I felt I had been transported to another world and it’s a feeling that I still have when I sing on stage.

The rest, as they say, is history. I started singing lessons just a few weeks after joining the choir and my passion and dedication to singing never wavered. I honestly can’t imagine my life without music, being able to pour out all of my emotions through singing and playing.

Of course I have many more stories and experiences to tell and I’d really love to hear your opinions on what I share. I’m always open to and grateful for suggestions and advice but I thought as the first post of the blog, this initial foray into the magical world of singing was the perfect story to tell.

2 Comments

  1. Hey Chris, what a wonderful idea to share stories about your singing experiences in your new blog. I have my own special experience with you as an opera singer when I accidentally listened to yiu singing the „Vincero“ aria Nessun dorma in the rehearsal room in Theater des Westens in Berlin on an august evening half an hour before the rehearsal for Hunchback of Notre Dame for an audience of six or seven people blessed by the moment. I do not want to miss it and have these minutes in the „room for special moments“ in my heart. Coming three minutes later wiuld have make me miss the moment. What was it that made it occur this way. I will never know. But this also makes experiences in music so special. What is it to remember the time? Or to let it pass by? We will come to listen to you on stage. Let me know where and when. Yours Sven, from the other side „the Bass window“ of the Glöckner Stage in Berlin

    1. Thank you so much Sven, it’s so wonderful to hear feedback like this and I’m honoured to have shared this special moment with you. I know there are so many incredible moments from The Hunchback that will always stay in my heart too!

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